A list of publications by Human Rights Watch

Below is a list of publications by Human Rights Watch which are relevant to the work of the Pat Finucane Centre.

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TO SERVE WITHOUT FAVOR

Policing, Human Rights, and Accountability in Northern Ireland Police conduct throughout the long conflict in Northern Ireland has given rise to serious allegations of human rights abuses. Four areas of policing are highlighted that raise urgent human rights concerns: the draconian police powers enjoyed by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) under Northern Ireland’s emergency regime; the policing of the summer 1996 marching season; the dramatic rise in paramilitary punishment assaults and expulsions; and the persistent allegations of collusion between members of the security forces and loyalist paramilitary groups (2165) 5/97, 192 pp., ISBN 1-56432-216-5, $15.00/£12.95

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CONTINUED ABUSES BY ALL SIDES IN NORTHERN IRELAND

While paramilitary groups carry out punishment shootings and beatings, the government is responsible for the failure to ensure that police officers and soldiers are held accountable for the use of lethal force, unfair trials, and ill-treatment in detention, among other violations. (D604) 3/94, 10 pp., $3.00

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NORTHERN IRELAND: HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES BY ALL SIDES

Continuing human rights abuses in Northern Ireland include killings by paramilitary groups and security forces, street harassment by security forces, ill-treatment in detention, problems in obtaining a fair trial, the abandonment of normal policing in some troubled areas and harassment by paramilitary organizations. (D506) 5/93, 9 pp., $3.00

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FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION IN THE U.K.

Britain has historically been a society with great respect for the tradition of freedom of the press. In recent years, however, there has been a significant increase in restrictions on liberty. Not only have press freedoms been threatened with greater restrictions, but broadcasting has faced similar challenges, and the right to protest has been limited. (D503) 2/93, 33 pp., $3.00

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CHILDREN IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Abused by Security Forces & Paramilitaries Children in Northern Ireland are caught between two powerful groups -- security forces on one hand, and paramilitary groups that advocate political violence on the other. Many of the almost 3,000 people who have lost their lives in "The Troubles" since 1969 have been children. Moreover, police officers and soldiers harass young people on the street, hitting, kicking and insulting them. Police officers in interrogation centers threaten, trick and insult youngsters and sometimes physically assault them. Children accused of crimes are locked up in adult detention centers and remand prisons in shameful conditions. Because police in Northern Ireland have largely abdicated normal policing in many troubled areas, paramilitary groups have filled the resulting vacuum with alternative criminal justice systems. These paramilitary groups -- the Irish Republican Army on the Catholic side and the Ulster Defense Association on the Protestant side -- police their own communities. They punish children they believe to be "anti-social" by shooting or brutally beating them, and sometimes by banishing them from Northern Ireland. The abuses of children by all sides violate international human rights laws and standards as well as the laws of war. (0804) 7/92, 112 pp., ISBN 1-56432-080-4, $10.00

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PRISON CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

Prisoners in the U.K., which has the highest per capita rate of imprisonment in Western Europe, suffer from unsanitary conditions, extremely poor conditions for remand prisoners, and the lack of useful educational or work activities. In addition, this report describes the serious problem of overcrowding in many prisons in England as well as the political tensions running high in Belfast Remand Prison in Northern Ireland. Helsinki Watch and the Prison Project of Human Rights Watch, after numerous interviews and prison visits, call on the government to install in-cell plumbing, allow remand prisoners out of their cells for more than a few hours each day, and provide educational and work training that might help prisoners avoid recidivism. (0669) 6/92, 64 pp., ISBN 1-56432-066-9, $7.00

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HUMAN RIGHTS IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Human rights abuses are persistent and chronic in Northern Ireland, affecting Protestants and Catholics alike, and are committed by both security forces and paramilitary groups in violation of international standards. (0200) 10/91, 200 pp., ISBN 1-56432-020-0, $15.00

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ABDICATION OF RESPONSIBILITY

The Commonwealth and Human Rights The membership of the Commonwealth is diverse in every respect, and an increased commitment to human rights would cut across the usual divides of region, economic system and political structure. Because many members are among the leading donor nations, such as Australia and Great Britain, or important regional forces, such as India and Kenya, the development of a Commonwealth human rights effort could have considerable impact. What virtually every member state has in common with the others is an imperfect record of assuring protection for human rights. While dealing with only nine of the fifty Commonwealth nations (and with only some of their human rights problems), this report nevertheless documents many serious human rights abuses. (0472) 10/91, 82 pp., ISBN 1-56432-047-2, $7.00

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RESTRICTED SUBJECTS

Freedom of Expression in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom lacks a written constitution or any affirmative statutory protection for freedom of expression, and in recent years, the climate for free speech there has worsened. The government has used the Official Secrets Act and laws of confidence to muzzle the press from covering defense, intelligence or military policy. Books and periodicals are routinely sanitized because of libel laws that require writers and journalists to prove the truth of every claim they make. In the face of mounting political protests, police authorities have been given substantially greater powers over assemblies and demonstrations. The traditional independence of British broadcasting has been eroded. The "troubles" in Northern Ireland have spawned draconian anti- terrorism measures there and in the rest of the United Kingdom. As reported by Helsinki Watch and the Fund for Free Expression, the report also makes recommendations for legal reform. (0448) 9/91, 80 pp., ISBN 1-56432-044-8, $7.00

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HUMAN RIGHTS IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Since the 1960's when "the Troubles" began, Northern Ireland has been plagued by violence; more than 2,800 people have died. Helsinki Watch visited Northern Ireland in January 1991 and investigated the use of lethal force by security forces and paramilitaries, abuses in detention, harassment of civilians by security forces, fair trial issues including the non-jury Diplock courts, free expression questions and exclusion orders. This report contains Helsinki Watch's findings as well as testimony taken from people who say they have been abused by security forces. (0200) 1991, 160 pp., ISBN 1-56432-020-0, $15.00

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